Tag Archives: 1095

Schrade 152 Serie Sharpfinger — Fred Perrin & Nemo’s old review.

PErrinsharp

Twenty years ago they were no digital caméra and I used my video caméra and extract one frame. Hey, this is Fred, in 1998 and this is a review kept in JD archives when it was first displayed on Geocities, a true blast of the past ! More to come soon… 😉
The other pictures are taken from the Sharpfinger PITS comparaison review.

So let’s see that old review and tone we use to employ back then:

“SCHRADE
SHARPFINGER and WOLFERINE
152OT 152UH by Fred Perrin (and Nemo)

An extension of your finger that was good 
for skinning large squirrels and small elephants”

If the definition of a knife is a sharp piece of steel and an handle, these both models are pure knives. 
I mean its a simple concept but simple ideas are the “highest” ideas. 
Created in 1974 by Mr. Henry Baer, to be a skinner, this knife is now a Classic amongst the Classics. (what will be in 25 years all these tactical models of today ?). 
But who cares about a $30.00 knife ($19.95 at Walmart…)?

Us.

The main difference between both models is: 
The Sharpfinger is 1095 Carbon Steel and the Wolferine is Schrade Plus (440A stainless steel). 
Period.

The 3.5″ is curved like a bear claw with sharpened back (the back of the claw not of the bear !)  
This is unique design has been used by many other brand factory.

The handle is bowed and the ricasso forms a finger stop and prevents the hand to slip on the blade. 
On the back of the blade there is a place for the thumb. 
The handle is thin on the side of the blade and thick at the butt: the grip is secured and confortable.

The great control of the blade makes the 152’s an real extension of your hand. Like a sharp finger in fact.

The handle is made of plastic. It’s very confortable for hard uses.

There is a lanyard hole. And that’s an important detail !

The shape of the blade is really polyvalent and not striclky confine in capping and skinning purposes. 
You can eat with it, cook with it, work on wood, clean fish etc etc… 

The blade is flat grounded on both sides for a better resistance and incredible polyvalence.

To resharp the blade is really a piece of cake with both steels. Dulling the blade is not so easy as the blade got an excellent edge holding.

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As far as we are concern, we really appreciate that knife because it’s a utilitary knife and the all around fixed blade archetype. 

In his book ” Knives, Knife Fighting and Related Hassles”, Marc “Animal” Macyoung shows his Sharpfinger as his utility knife and main self defense blade.  
You can be shocked by this concept but it’s true. 
It’s a small knife with gutts but let’s be clear, Marc and my friends strongest cuts are made in Pizzas or Quiche !  We don’t remove sentries everyday and we try to avoid gang war. 
But anyway for a low price you got a low profile self defense and utility blade. 
Light sharp with good balance, this is all about.

Back In 1974, they was no tactical fashion. The prime design of the Sharpfinger was surely not self defense but as a very well made tool, you can turn it as a very well made weapon. 
For example the Machette is made as an agricultural tool but in a lot of countries it is the poorman sword. 
There is no shame as turning a good utility knife into a good self defense knife. 
Compared to all the “tactical” knives hype around, it’s strange why the152 and many classical designs are ignored by TK afficionados. Cheap doesn’t mean crap. 
(Imagine a 152 with g-10 handle and kydex sheath,  and with its blade bead blasted…enough tactical for you ?) 
Don’t forget the “tactical knife” is the knife you got in your hand and the right moment…

Marc said to us: 
“Be warned, the purist get real unnerved when you use a “fighting knife” as a tool. I beat the hell out of my knives. They look at them and say (in horrified tones) “What have you been doing with this knife ?” 
That’s why bladesmiths consider me such a savage. 
I got over that the day that I climbed a cliff and halfway up I discovered it turned to shale. I ended up hacking new hands holds with my knife and moving up a foot at a time. I don’t care how much that knife cost, it was either ruin it or fall. 
The Schrade 152 is one of the few knives I haven’t been able to break despite seriously abusing it.”

Judicious Marc Macyoung. His books are a kind of “checkpoint” for anyone interested in self defense. 
A “must know” . 
 

The sheath of 152 is made of genuine leather. It’s old fashioned but nice “a la” scout.  
Great for the price.

By the way, if you lose yourself in the jungle of your supermarket, take a look at that Schrade knives. 
You will perharps notice one of that original 152 and perharps, again, you will adopt it. Definitively. 
 

The 152 ? 
A Real utility knife. 
Period.

Fred Perrin & Nemo

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Robert Young Pelton DPX H.E.S.T. Xmas Glimpse

I have just received my HEST and I’m going to write a review in 2010…
Sometime in 2010 ! Not in january.
It’s obvious. How could I write any “opening the parcel” review on a tool which is made to live with ? I need to use it but also I need to edc it.
To EDC a knife means to get in osmosis with the design and start to wear and tear my pockets with only one knife. And osmosis got a long incubation for such a polyvalent tool. Especially when you know you gonna like it !

DPX HEST ROBERT YOUNG PELTON

First impressions out of the box ?
Wow this knife is/feels/looks solid.
This is a thick and sharp knife. Very sharp thanks to its geometry. It cuts bread better than many of my thinner blades. The HEST is deadly serious in its purpose: to be reliable even if you missuse it. There is no “gadget” feel in it. A good friend, reliable if you take care of it.

Ergos ?
Wow. The handle fits like a glove. The hand is encapsuled between the choil and the prybar. What’s more could I say ? This knife is screaming to be used. Not only used hard but also it’s screaming to be used cleverly. By giving you holes in the handle, skeleton option, pry bar, the conceptors of that knife are also opening a door for opportunities. As one of the rare multitools with no mobile parts the HEST looks like a great addition to your SAK… Hey you can open a beer with it and even the pry bar can be used as a flat screwdriver.

The beauty is in the eye of the beholder… but the HEST is very sexy. It’s a knife with a very strong character, and it’s a confidence builder. You need to desserve it, as, the clever you are, the better the Hest will perform.

DPX HEST ROBERT YOUNG PELTON

It’s very rare to find a short FB which is designed as a good EDC companion for adventures. It’s could be adventures in your backyard, in the woods, or in exotic far away places.
You feel like it’s made to carried with you all the time and to develop a “special” bond with you. So I guess it’s going to be my main FB for 2010.
The RC3 and the IZULA will be used by friends in Italy and France but the Riddle of The Hest need to be answered in a very personnal matter.
DPX HEST ROBERT YOUNG PELTON
The only thing I could say now is: I love it. I love the way it feels in the hand !
It’s thick, sharp,looks great and it’s a Rat Cutlery Knife made by Rowen ! Wow !

Nemo's HEST
This is mine stripped from its black coating. My Lemon HEST !

Rat Cutlery RC-3

I got the chance to own a Rat Cutlery RC-3 plain edge. I love that little rascal and since I got it, I use it hard and a lot !
Jeff Randall and Mike Perrin (owners of Rat Adventure Training and Ratcutlery) have created an outstanding and affordable tool, one of the best of their Ratcutlery line of knives which contains a lot of great tools ! (Also I think I will review their excellent book “Adventure In The Third World” very soon!)
Jeff RandallMike Perrin

Jeff Randall & Mike Perrin (Photo (c) J. Randall)

These two gentlemen have been designing knives for more than a decade. Their designs is inspired by their own needs. Their land of testing is the peruvian rain forest, near Iquitos, the biggest city on the amazon where they teach how to survive in the jungle. When they are not teaching to Special Forces or help a film crew to cross the forest,  these two modern “Tintins”, half journalists, hall witnesses of the world, enjoy the uncharted zone, pushing always the envelop of their curiosity as they’re answering the call of adventure. As a knife is an important part of your gear (with a machette), they’ve been using a lot of steel and even review them in Tactical Knives and now in SWAT Magazine.

Adventures in The Third World
(Also I think I will review their excellent book “Adventure In The Third World” very soon!)

Seems like the RC-3 is their favorite design to date. And this is true this little knife
If you favor lil’ fixed blade over folder you should really enjoyed the RC3 in everyday situations. First, the ergonomy should fit your need perfectly. The choil (just under where RC-3 is written on the blade) is very handy for precises works and micarta just feels great even with wet hands. There is no hotspot. there is even some kind of sensual feeling whil holding this blade. The square section makes it easy to index the blade in the dark or without to look at it.
I love where the balance is (right on the logo enprinted on the micarta handle), which give a lot of life to the blade but this is really a personnal preference.

The full flat grind blade is thin (which is an exploit for US Designs these days who tends to favor thick knives…) and it gives a great power to the cutting. The slicing is easy and deep. I also like the belly: turning the knife into a great slicer with a drop point which caracterize it as a classic hunting skinner knife immediatly.
RC-3 and friends

1095 is a great steel. A good old steel to be precise. I always been able to get it super sharp. (My nightmare is S90V, D2 or BG42 which are “a bear to sharp” without diamonds.) 1095 is a classic of carbon steels which is a great steel when it’s well heattreated BUT it can rust faster than an angry chimp will throw feces on you.
With the coating used on the blade, there is no concern. That coating is very very scratch resistant and it gives a positive grip when you work holding your knife by the naked blade. Very often I sand the coating of my knives but here, I don’ plan to do it as I enjoy it as it is !
What is the outstanding is the great heat treatment by Rowen, Idaho, on all RAT Cutlery knives, at 57HRC the strenght of the blade gives you a lot of confidence in that little knife.

The sheath system give you dozen of alternative ways to carry your blade. My favorite is in the front pocket or in my bag.

It’s easy to forget it and very handy to use. Notice how I use the cord stopper as a plug to retain the sheath in uppper position in my pocket.
A push of your thumb on the thermoformed plastic and the blade is free.

So if you are looking for a little fixed blade which can take a punishment and carry on cutting.
I have used it for batoning, kitchen duty, at the sea (the edge get som pitting but I was able to strop it on my leather belt…). On very hard plastic (the coating can be noisy when you need to saw in plastic…) on wood (the cut gives some kind of soft patina to the wood, like M2 does…) so whittling is easy (even if a sak is helpful for delicate carving). Chopping is limited to making some notches with a flick of your wrist. It’s very easy to convex the grind and get better performances but sa far as I am concern, the edge on mine (40°) is enough for clean cuts even on hard wood.
The RC3 is a great alternative to a folder. Its lock will never fail you!
And it’s a real workhorse covered by a great warranty, lifetime, no question, unconditionnal guarranty.

Old RC-3
(This RC-3 is used everyday by a friend of Jeff Randall who live in Peru.
Jeff wanted to exchange it for a new but his friend always refused.) (Photo (c) J. Randall)

I notice also this knife could be a great “self defense tool” with its glass breaking pommel and its positive grip and not all knives designed as tools are good also for that other darker territory. No surprise this knife is a huge success in the USA and is favor by Police Officers and Special Forces. It even got the outstanding rate of 4,77/5,00 at NTOA review ! Bushcrafters of the world seems also to love that short knife for its polyvalence, design and quality.

Mike and RC3
Mike Perrin and his RC-3 (Photo (c) J. Randall)

You can even use it as a light chopper for notching branches. This is a knife you can take with you while camping, with his friendly antisheeple size, it won’t raise any eyebrow when you will start to use it to whittle some sticks or clean your game unless you do that in the middle of the city !
So if you are looking for a solid, sharp, reliable knife which can be used as EDC or packed for any trip. The RC-3 has proven all those qualities in those last three years worldwide from ranchers to bushcrafters to US Marshalls to adventurers.

Cheers
Nemo

RC3