Spyderco Stretch C90CF – Part II Stretch on the Bench.

I was testing my Stretch when I got the urge to compare it to the Daddy of all my Spydies: my M390 Millie.

My M390 got a very thin factory edge and I was able to maintain mainly by stropping on leather. it cuts like a laser.
Compared to my new Stretch the difference was hug. The C90 with a thinner blade got a thick edge. I was not able to measure it but it’s a good 40°…

So I have decided to convex the edge of that thin full flat ground blade, even if ZDP 189 is a bear to sharp.
My first step has been with Lansky diamond pads for eliminating the shoulder of the thick edge. I was able to do it with out scratch the flat of the blade.
Then I have stropped the blade on leather with white compound until I got a mirror finish.

Stretch on the bench

Nemo Convexed edge on Stretch

The performance is night and day. I will check now how the ZDP189 convexed edge will behave, but I had applied the same treatment with a Michael Walker which is now used every week end as a skinning knife. Anyway, I have been able to cut through a plastic bottle’s butt is one pushcut. My C90CF is now laser sharp. As sharp as my Gayle Bradley but certainly not as strong. We will check that later.


Talking about sharpness. The jimping is really sharp and hurting the hand. Again diamonds has given me the possibility to eliminate those teeths. The new version of the Stretch got better jimping, the same as those applied on the choil.

So now, my Stretch is ready for more tests, tonight it will tomatoes slicing time.

Conclusion in the Part 3.



Oh yes it cuts…

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Spyderco C90CF – Sal Glesser’s gentleman bushcraft folder

Nemo Stretch C90CF

For twice these last months, I was considering myself being able to announce my best “EDC ever”. After the Sage 2 Sebenza inheritance, the “hard to get razor” rare Spyderco Paramillie in S90V, the megasharp little Michael Walker, the solid and forgiving Gayle Bradley, the wonderfully engineered Native, the minimalist friendly Pointu, the chopping solid Lionspy, the Techno which is a pure flawless stout companion and lately the Spyderco Southard which is such a great flipping friend served by a crapped clip. I love all of them and I considered myself spoiled. My case is closed.

Now what would be Sal Glesser favorite EDC ?
I knew the Stretch was a special project developped by Sal “in house” for his own needs and I was able to notice how the Stretch was continuing to continued into a Spyderco classic, providing one of the best high tech steel into a lightweight package: the discontinuated C90 and C90BL and the new Green Arrow: C90PGRE.
“The C90 Stretch started as a pet-project lockback knife design. Spyderco’s owner and chief designer made it for his personal use, incorporating features he wanted. He wanted high performance blade steel with edge retention super-powers for outdoor cutting: things like wood, rope and anything encountered in the wild. It had to work equally well indoors on cardboard, mail and fingernails. He sized it so it wouldn’t scare non’knife people and made it look slick on the off chance he’d someday have to wear a suit.”
Isn’t it exiting ? The Spyderpapa has invented a knife for his own needs and no one else. Remember, the famous C36 Military has been design for his son Eric for example… But this very C90 has been designed for no one else but Sal. “The Stretch has been a 25 year work-in-progress and we’d like to continue to make it better. The ZDP FRN version finds a lot of my pocket time.”

So I got now the great opportunity to pocket a Stretch. This one is the one with the handle in peel-ply carbon fiber, with a four-way clip, left/right-hand and tip-up/tip-down and a full flat ground blade of solid ZDP-189.
Quoting my friend Wouter: “Stretch II is IMO a perfect knife for the connoisseur. Its looks might be plain, the blade might seem too thin, but for the knowledgeable knife enthusiast it’s a very impressive folder.”

Ah, ZDP 189 ! I like it on my Rockstead Higo but I love it on my C22CF. On both knife I have been able to cure its chipping with ease and to convex gently their edge. Here we got a 3mm thick blade on a very thin handle: pocket easy. Despite his hourglass clip the Stretch could be the father of my Chaparral. A gentleman folder with an outdoors purpose. The Stretch is incredibly thin and oozing quality. No blade play. Smooth opening. Extraflat design. The Stretch got a James Bond’s appeal.
Mine, after twenty strops on my leather belt is now sharp as my Bushcrafter. So time to test it and to fall in love again.

But quoting Spoonrobot: “Writing about a specific hobby always brings some inherent problems, there are only so many ways to praise a folding knife. I recently made the mistake of declaring a knife “the sharpest out of the box I’ve ever seen.” Only to have the next two knives prove to be even sharper. This makes it quite hard to be taken seriously, so in light of this I’ve decided to make slightly less grandiose claims when describing my newest slicey thing.”

Part II: improving the Stretch’s edge.

Thoughtful Southard part 2.

Spyderco Southard Nemo

Using the Southard is a pure pleasure.
Why ?
Because you got a thin edge and a thick spine.
The full belly has proven to be hard to mistrust. It’s a curved guillotine.
Cardboard sheaths are cut like with a lightsaber, tomatoes are slices thin, rabbit’s bones are cut with no chipping even wooden wine boxe from Burgandy are open with a twist of the handle.
The thick handle is really confortable for hard and long period of work. I cannot find any hot spot in this knife especially since… I have removed that awful clip.
It’s look like folded metal sheath. It’s pointy and will pierce my pocket instead, it’s shiny, sharp and will keep my knife on an high profile while clipped to my pocket.
The Southard is so nice without its clip.
Since I have Steve Rice from STR’s Backyard knifeworks who has gently sent to me one of his beautiful Lowrider’s clip he has especially invented for the Southard and a Southard part 3 is in preparation.

For now on, my C156 is clipless and this is a pure wonder. The Carpenter version of M390 has proven to be absolutly reliable as CTS 204P is really a great steel. No chipping so far. Stay razor sharp for a week long. Easy to strope on leather. Easy to maintain on ceramic.

But clip are an issue on a lot of flipper. Check the Massdrop Falcon for example.

You can see there is a lot of attention to detail. I love how the blade flush with the handle, especially near the pivot. I love the No Spin construction. The absence of any play in any direction. This folding knife looks more solid and beefy than my Sebenzas !
The flipper is acting as a guard. But its all rounded so choking up the blade is possible. The asymetrical handle’s slabs/liners are not a big deal as they are providing a very comfortable experience.

As you can notice the blade of the Southard got something special. It’s full belly but also it seems like the tip is able to catch the cutting material. Like the last centimeter toward the tip is a claw. When I cut with my Southard I can feel all the length of the edge being in use. This is really something unique in that edge design. The blade cuts with ease without any drift. Like the Spyderco Dodo.
Yes, the Dodo is one my favorite whittling knife. Not for fine work but to cut a rod from a tree. The continious curves in the Dodo edge make it a great matter separator. The Dodo was able to cut into hardwood with less energy than any of my knives. The belly and the geometry of the Southard are in the same league.
Now the thick spine is a pleasure for my thumb when I’m doing powerful pushcuts. I can choke up the blade beyond the flipper and work with all my weight. Thanks also to its thick square handle I do not need gloves like with the Lionspy or my Sage 2.
So my mileage with that flipping beauty so far is exceeding my expectations. It’s even hard for me to enjoy my Techno or my Tuff or my Persian: the Flipper is really addictive and beyond the gimmick there is a really thoughtful design in that Southard.
Easy to use. Confortable. Easy to clean.Easy to keep razor sharp.
The Southard is also an eyecandy.
Anyway, mine has been used daily, in the plate, the kitchen, the wood, the boat, the city, the car, the office, the field, the dirt, the rain, the sea… It cuts. Stay sharp. Is easy on my palm. Is nice in my eyes.

SPyderco Southard without clip
No clip, more clip.

Southard Techno Nemo
The Techno clip is really the best. The Techno is the only SPyderco folder which is absolutly flawless IMHO.

Southard Techno Nemo
Fred Perrin and Jerry van Cook ?

Southard Nemo
CTS 204P is easy on white ceramic and the edge is kept on the popping hair sharp level.

Spyderco Southard
Eye candy when closed too !

Spyderco Southard C156GBN – Flipping Beauty.

Southard

“One of the most advanced Spyderco folders ever produced.”
dixit Spyderco on their site

Come on…

OK let’s give a look.

Oh no, I’m in love again. I really thought the Wonderful Techno would be the Ultimate EDC, even beating the amazing Michael Walker and the great Gayle Bradley and the Legendary Military and the perfect Native 5 and…. but the Gods of the Hole in The Blade got their own way.

Why ? Tell me why ?
Why the Southard is not two inch longer and would loss its portability? At an hair under 8 inches (202mm) open and 114 mm closed (great blade/handle ratio BTW) this knife is not unforgettable once clipped: you forget it even when not clipped. Worst than that, I’m able to carry the Southard in my watch pocket.
Arrrgh. Brad Southard, if you hear me, I hate you for this amazing design.
And thank you. Thank you for giving us that pointy shiny clip with high visibility. Thank you ! At least you have left something to improve. Lucky us.
This clip is a joke actually.

The knife could be also a Spyderjoke. Go figure:
This the first Spyderco to be not advertised for its ease of opening with its hole. “Don’t use the hole ! It got a flipper ! ”

OK as far as I’m concern the only Spydercos with useless holes are their fixed blades but the SPOT, SWICK… inspired by Fred Perrin’s Lagriffe.

So “Don’t use the hole as primary opening device… use the Flipper”.
In France Flipper is a dolphin. For Spyderco it’s a pedal. Some Dolphin are also pedal but only during le Tour de France and this is another story.

OK let’s talk about its blade. Have you notice its belly ? From the tip to the flipper, the edge does a beautiful arc. It means, cutting power.
The blade is 4mm thick but its edge is thin. This means a lot of cutting power. I was able to cut through hard plastic with the same ease as my Gayle Bradley. this is impressive.
The flipper, once the knife is open offers a guard to your finger erasing any fears of lock failure.

The lock ? A Reeve Integral Lock with some refinement like a system to prevent over bending the lockbar. Very clever.

Lets’ talk about smoothness. With its wide ball bearing pivot the action on the flipper is smooth and only the friction of the lock bar seems to brake the movement. It’s not as smooth as the Gayle Bradley but it’s at least as smooth as the Lionspy and much smoother than the Tuff, both R.I.L. folders.
Taiching is again showing how they hare great in manufacturing. The blade is dead centered and everything is perfect but the clip.

There is one detail I love: no stop pin. The stop pin is hidden near the axis. With its open handle the Southard is a breeze to clean.
The absence of hump of the hole makes it a beauty. With its very uncommon blade mixing drop point and sheepfoot… with the back of the blade offering a thumb space to rest. All angle are smooth but the G10 gives a great grip.
The Southard is a pure hardecore folder. You feel you could thrust it with full force. The flipper/guard will prevent any slippering and lock failure.
This is a knife wich express itself in your hand. Perfectly balanced. It’s fast and easy to put in use. Really this is something to experiment by yourself. This is not a big knife but with its 1/1 handle ratio it’s all business.
The steel is one of the latest powder metallurgy Über Alloy made by Carpenter the CTS 204P. The kind of monster steel with almost 2 percent of carbon. For now the knife is so sharp, I was able to cut cardboard with the ease hollow ground blade desserve. I was laos able to stumble on a stable.
And…. zero damage to the edge. As far as I’m concern I’m quite impressed by the new generation of Powder Steel.

Now the handle is a little on the squarish side. It’s thick as there is a brown G10 liner over a liner of titanium. This asymetry could be a show stopper for some but actually I like the way the handle fills the palm of my hand. The knife is anchored. I will see in the next review if there is any hot spots… I already spot one: the clip !

The Persian carpet, even the most beautiful got all a little imperfection. For one reason, only God can create perfection not humans.
This is the meaning of that clip.
This piece of shining metal has already tried to pierce my denims pocket… and it hurts my palm. This is the only imperfection of the Southard who’s desserved better. BTW a dremel should be able to round that pointy tip on that prehistoric clip…

But this is true. My Techno, for example, is absolutly flawless. Nothing to sand on the handle. Everything is perfect.
And the Southard got a Perfect Flaw. But you forgive everything to such a Flipping Beauty.

The C156GBN is the kind of folder who can make you sold all your other knives. It’s ‘that’ great.

Southard
Peekaboo in the pocket watch… no clip used.

Spyderco Air – Popping Sharp ! by JD

I had asked my Dutch friend JD to write a review of the Spyderco Air. He’s a big fan of small blades. From the classic slipoint to the most modern design, he’s always seeking for the best geometry in cutting. Through the years he has developped an wide encyclopedic knowledge in cutlery but also has proven to be the best free hand sharpener I have ever met, being able to enhance any edge to a very high level of pure performance. Here is his review of the Spyderco Air:

 
Spyderco Air by JD
 

I have had the Air in my possession for 4 months of which I have carried it for about two. When I first got it I liked the knife overall but thought it was too thick behind the edge and found blade finish a little rough. Since then I have thinned out the shoulder of the edge, so now the blade flows from the back to the edge in a slightly convex curve. The first halve centimeter from the edge is now just a little thicker than on an Opinel in the same area. I consider the blade grind on Opinels to be a benchmark of a thin, very well cutting, folder blade. I used an extra course DMT diamond stone for most of the shaping. It was then cleaned up with sandpaper. The edge was finished on an extra fine DMT stone. It how has a fine jet toothy edge that will easily cut phonebook paper, shave arm hair, as well as be grabby enough to bite into and cut plastic packaging material.
I tried sharpening it with the brown Spyderco ceramic hone. A hone that I have good experiences with sharpening other (Spyderco) knives. But found that for this knife it was not the right tool for the job. It polished more than it ground and so was right for the shaping part of sharpening. The M4 steel the blade is made of is quite wear resistant compared to, for instance, VG10, a steel Spyderco uses in many of its popular models. M4 is not stainless.
I use the Air to cut up an apple in the evening, to cut a piece of cheese or to get liverwurst from its plastic packaging. It also works well for opening up a kaiser roll and putting butter on it for lunch (butter with the back of the blade). It work great for the usual edc tasks of opening packages and cutting paper. With use, mostly thanks to the apples, it has developed a nice dark patina.

Spyderco Air by JD

The handle feels good in the hand. No sharp points and, thank goodness, no jimping! Only when you push hard on it does the open construction become a little uncomfortable.
The Air opens and closes smoothly. The linerlock on my example has moved a little past the middle of the locking ramp. Slightly further then when new.

The detent is strong enough to keep the knife savely closed in the pocket.
In the pocket you hardly notice it, it is so light and compact. I have not missed a pocket clip at all! I think on this knife a clip would compromise the ergonomics of the handle to much.
The more I carry this knife the more I enjoy it. Thinning behind the edge make all the difference! It has transformed the knife from okay to a great cutter.
JD

Spyderco Pingo – Do NOT mess with the Danish Cookie

In those days of tactical fever.
In those days of fears.
In this last day after the End of the World.
This is the time to change all the rules.

For the first time , Spyderco is releasing a folding knife with a hole in a blade which is like a blue carrot’s salad for a sniper: useless.
A folder with a hole in the blade so tiny it will only catch germs….

WTF ?

The Pingo is a collaborative effort of Danish knifemakers Jens Anso and Jesper Voxnaes. This knife was specifically designed to conform to the knife laws of Denmark, which prohibit both lock-blade folding knives and all forms of one-hand-opening knives.

(I love copy and paste… from there.)

OK now I’m currently carrying a Spyderco Techno. I love this little dwarven titanium folder but the Pingo ???

The handle looks well thought. The blade is unusual and non threatening. Sober design.
Wait a minute, the Pingo looks like it could be a great EDC.

Spyderco Pingo

Spyderco Pingo

Spyderco Pingo

Spyderco Pingo

Spyderco Pingo

Spyderco Pingo

Spyderco Pingo

Now after two weeks of being in my pocket 24/7 this little Pingo is an excellent surprise.
First thing first…. DO NOT READ THIS IF YOU ARE DANISH BUT: I open it with a flick.
This is good as I do not live in beautiful Danemark.
But beyond that detail, the knife got excellent ergos. Great ergos !
Its a full four fingers handle knife ready for hard work because it has a great belly and a great geometry.
And this knife is a cutting machine.
I was very surprised to see how that little knife was able to handle a lot of jobs with ease.
The belly is on the reason of its high perf. But also the razor thin full flat ground blade.

All in all for a great price you can go legal on a lot of ground with an incredible workhorse. Trust me the Pingo will surprise you.
Kuddos to Jens Anso and Jesper Voxnaes fo bringing it and Spyderco for always giving birth to the most exotic and pragmatic projects.

Spyderco C22 in ZDP189 Italian Hunter Update by Valter Nencetti

Valter Nencetti

Dear Nemo,

here is the review on the knife you have given to me to test. It has passed all the tests with flying colors during the hunting season. I thought it would chip but it has not happen. Of course I have not abuse it. I think your reprofiling of the edge is perfect. The maker (Spyderco) will be happy.

See you soon,
Valter.”

Valter Nencetti

Every year for more than two decades I have been welcomed by Walter, Francesca and all the Nencetti family in their beautiful mountains at the East of Florence in Tuscany. Walter is an avid hunter but also is a doctor in genetics working as a researcher at the University. A bear of a man, he is a true landlord knowledgeable in nature and the art of woodcraft even if he won’t use that word for something he consider as natural as breathing. He was even able to save and promote a breed of high performance hunting dogs “Segugio dell’Appennino”. (click on the name for an English article he wrote on it).
Here the link to my initial review.
Here the Michael Walker six years after.

Valter Nencetti Dogs

Those dogs are incredible: they are able to track alone in the valley as the hunter is waiting on the hill. It’s their constant barking which keep the hunter in touch with them. The way they bark gives him all the information needed as the dogs have found tracks, are now tracking and are bringing back the hare or the boar to be shot. The dogs need to be very smart to track an hare. This nocturnal big rabbit got a very special moving pattern to leave a minimum of tracks behind him. He systematically leaves dead end before to go back on his track and to go in another direction. The dogs need to be very clever to know when the heir has made a U Turn and especially to find the direction it has taken. Those dogs are high performance dogs, really.

Valter Nencetti

Valter goes hunting as soon as he got some times on his hands and he uses his hunting knives for skinning hares, deers and boars.
I have been able to offer him Spyderco knives since 2000. His favorite so far was a Paramillie of the first génération.The S30V full flat ground pointy blade has him main skinning knife.
So I have decided to gave him “Sky” my C22 in ZDP189 for good measure. (I have kept another one as a Safe’s Queen…).
As I had reviewed it before, this is the best pushcutter ever made by Spyderco with the wonderful Gayle Bradley.
So here is his review in Italian (translation are a click away with your fav translator on the Net)

Francesca e Valter in la Noce Di Francesca
(And if you want to know where Valter is living, here is also the link to his wife agriturismo:
http://www.lanocedifrancesca.com/)

Here is his review in Italian.

Spyderco C22 ZDP-189 Seki-City Japan

Agile, elegante, leggero ma al contempo robusto ed efficiente, Spyderco C22 ZDP-189 è un piccolo coltello a serramanico che riesce a sintetizzare in 54,4 g di peso un condensato di alta tecnologia a servizio della funzionalità.
Immediatamente riconoscibile l’appartenenza al marchio Spyderco, non solo per il foro nella lama ma anche per la linea inconfondibile, questo coltello si differenzia però dagli altri della serie per la maggiore leggerezza ottenuta con un’impugnatura ben bilanciata, realizzata con materiali leggeri ma di elevata resistenza e soprattutto con una lama sottile e durissima. E’ proprio quest’ultima che rappresenta una importante innovazione rispetto alle classiche, in genere adottate dalla casa costruttrice, ma anche da molte altre produttrici di coltelli. E’ noto infatti che la capacità di taglio, a parità di affilatura, è superiore nelle lame meno spesse, basta pensare al bisturi del chirurgo o anche al rasoio o lametta da barba, o anche a piccoli coltelli da cucina o per eseguire innesti in agricoltura.

Spyderco C22 si adegua perfettamente alle esigenze del cacciatore italiano che, al contrario di quello che si può immaginare, non ha bisogno di grossi e robusti coltelli per intendersi “tipo Rambo”, ma di un utensile funzionale che gli permetta anche di sbucciare una mela, oltre che spellare una lepre, un capriolo o un cinghiale. Riguardo a questi ultimi, una piccola lama affilata, come quella del coltello in questione, in mani sapienti è più che sufficiente per le normali esigenze. Occorre tener presente che il cacciatore deve muoversi rapidamente su terreni spesso impervi ed è limitato in questo dall’equipaggiamento (fucile, munizioni, scarponi e vestiario) che non può essere ulteriormente appesantito da un inutile “coltello da sopravvivenza” che comunque non risolve il problema dello spezzamento delle ossa (cinghiale, capriolo, cervo, daino) per le quali occorrono ben altri tipi di utensili.

In Italia, in genere, i grossi coltelli vengono utilizzati da cacciatori principianti, per lo più per incidere bastoni mentre sono alla posta per sparare al cinghiale; cittadini, più che campagnoli, che spesso non sanno neanche camminare nel bosco e che, il più delle volte, devono essere soccorsi, poichè si perdono nella foresta, magari nei medesimi luoghi di caccia frequentati da tempo.

Spyderco C22, durante un’intera stagione di caccia alla lepre e al capriolo, si è dimostrato un coltello particolarmente affidabile, imperdibile grazie alla sua Spyderco-clip di sicurezza, la sua lama si è mantenuta perfettamente affilata, utilizzando di tanto in tanto il cuoio per la rifinitura, non si è intaccata, nonostante la durezza dell’acciaio, forse anche per il particolare tipo di affilatura di cui era dotata e anche per la cura prestata al coltello. Un vero cacciatore, infatti non può pretendere che il suo coltello rimanga perfettamente affilato dopo un cattivo uso dello stesso e deve essere in grado di mantenerlo sempre tagliente, pronto all’uso.

Tutti i coltelli a serramanico Spyderco sono adatti alla caccia, poiché tutti sono di giuste dimensioni per il cacciatore Italiano. ZDP-189, del quale non avverti la presenza per la sua leggerezza e minimo ingombro, la mattina, quando ti metti i pantaloni per andare in ufficio al posto di quelli per la caccia, ti assicuri di riporlo gelosamente nella tasca poiché sai che ti potrà essere utile.

Valter Nencetti Carlo Boni
Carlo Boni and Valter Nencetti inspecting the knife.

SPyderco C22 Valter Nencetti

Spyderco C22 Valter Nencetti
With the Hare of the day.

Bisteca a la Fiorentina
Feeding the family with some Bisteca a la Fiorentina…

Spyderco Paramillie
Valter’s Paramillie 1 used mainly as skinning knife.

Paramillie

Paramilitary
A Paramillie 1st edition well used….

Valter Paramillie

The French version is here:
Agile, élégant, léger mais en même temps, robuste et efficace, Spyderco C22 est un petit couteau qui est capable de condenser en 54,4 g un concentré de haute technologie au service de la fonctionnalité.
Immédiatement reconnaissable de la marque Spyderco, non seulement pour le trou dans la lame, mais aussi pour la ligne unique, ce couteau se distingue des autres de la série, cependant, par plus de légèreté obtenue avec un manche bien équilibré, fabriqué avec des matériaux légers, mais d’une résistance élevée et surtout par une lame mince et très dure. C’est justemznt cette dernière qui une avancée majeure par rapport aux modèles classiques, généralement prisées par le fabricant, mais également par de nombreux autres fabricants de couteaux. Et à noter en fait que la capacité de couper, avec le même affûtage, est plus élevée avec les lames moins épaisses, Il suffit de penser au bistouri du chirurgien ou à la lame de rasoir ou la lame de barbier, ou même un petit couteau de cuisine ou pour effectuer des greffes dans l’agriculture .

Le Spyderco C22 s’adapte parfaitement aux exigences du chasseur italien qui, contrairement à ce que vous pouvez l’imaginer, n’a pas besoin de grands couteaux robustes destinés au “type Rambo», mais d’un outil fonctionnel qui lui permet également de peler une pomme, ainsi que de dépouiller un lapin, un chevreuil ou un sanglier. Sur ces derniers points, une petite lame pointue, comme celle du couteau en question, entre des mains expertes est plus que suffisant pour les besoins normaux. Veuillez noter que le chasseur doit se déplacer rapidement sur des terrains souvent inaccessibles et est donc limité en cela par l’équipement (fusil, munitions, bottes et vêtements) qui ne peuvent pas encore être appesantis par un «couteau de survie” inutile qui de toute façon ne résout pas le problème du désossement (sangliers, chevreuils, cerfs, daims) qui ont besoin de types très différents d’outils.

En Italie, en général, les grands couteaux sont utilisés par les chasseurs débutants, la plupart du temps pour couper des bâtons tandis qu’ils sont en poste pour tirer sur les sangliers; les citadins, au contraire des paysans , qui souvent ne savent même pas marcher dans les bois et, plus d’une fois, doivent être secourus, car ils sont perdus dans la forêt, peut-être dans les mêmes lieux fréquentés par temps de chasse.

Le Spyderco, au cours d’une saison entière de chasse au lièvre et au chevreuil, s’est révélé être un couteau particulièrement fiable, imanquablement grâce à son clip-Spyderco de sécurité, à sa lame qui est restée parfaitement afilée, en utilisant de temps en temps le cuir d’affutage, ne s’est pas abimée, en dépit de la dureté de l’acier, peut-être aussi grâce au type particulier de l’émouture dont il a été équipé de et également pour le soin apporté à la lame. Un vrai chasseur, en fait ne peut pas prétendre que son couteau reste parfaitement afuté, après un tel usage de maltraitance et doit être capable de le garder doit être en mesure de le garder toujours tranchant, prêt à l’emploi.

Tous les couteaux pliants de Spyderco sont adaptés pour la chasse, car ils sont tous juste là a bonne taille pour le chasseur italien. Le C22, qui ne signale pas sa présence par sa légèreté et sa petite taille, le matin, quand vous mettez votre pantalon pour aller travailler au bureau au lieu de ceux de la chasse, assurez-vous de le mettre dans votre poche jalousement parce que vous savez qu’il pourra vous être utile.

Acereuil – Another great limited Douk Douk version

Douk Douk Acereuil

The Acereuil is the special édition by Armes Bastille (Acheron) of the Douk Douk Ecureuil from Cognet. The Ecureuil (Squirrel) is a all silver knife when the Acereil got a blade handle with the Acheron logo on it (The Acheron pet has been designed by the gifted Bastien Bastinelli from Bastinelli’s Creation.). Fred Perrin told me about l’Ecureuil some decade ago. It seems to be his favorite Douk version back in those days.
Now I also got his Vendetta Douk Douk I have reviewed last year wich was an elegant and pointy adaptation of the Douk.

Acereuil

As you can notice, the handle is typically Douk Douk but the blade is a more “classic” spear point blade. Beautiful blade actually. XC75 us easy to keep razor and its very thin edge will not chip on that good old carbon steel.

Douk Douk

All three knives are great EDC and for less than 20 euros it’s a bargain. Douk’s got strong springs and perfect grinds. Each of them can be used on a plate or in the wood. Carrying is also legal in my country. this is definitively a tool not a weapon. once you get used to clean the blade, the patina starts to develop slowly giving them a lot of character.
Legal EDC with a very strong attitude, its a friendly knife.

Douk DOuk
Tre amigos…

Titanium handles, Sebenza, Sage 2 and Techno a little comparaison shot.

Sebenza SPyderco Sage 2 Techno

Above are three of favorite EDC knives ever and I wanted to compare them at least on pic.
The Sebenza is from 1996, Blade in ATS 34 so finely ground it has outlasted all BG42, S30V and S35V version. The lock has never failed me and did not move since I got it. It has been my Embassador knife and been shipped in all over the world for people to test it. Its last tester was Jeff Randall.
The Sage 2 is my favorite of the Sage serie offered by Spyderco and it has been reviewed already. It’s not as smooth as the Sebbie but the ergos and the in house convexed ground blade are giving very high scores on day to day cutting chores.
The techno is the last and has not left my front pocket. This is an amazing folder.

Sebenza SPyderco Sage 2 Techno

Now we got here three kind of blade, ergos and concepts. All shares the “heavy duty” label in my book.
The lock is solid as you hold it with your hand by just squeezing the handle. The Sebbie is so solid, it has been mauled in solid wood with no damage.
They are very very easy to rinse and clean. This is an incredible plus in the field on in the kitchen.
All those people who need skeleton liners do forget how it’s much easy to clean your folding knife when there is no hole inside its handle when dirt can go…
These knives are also eye candies and all have been noticed by sheeples as “tools” but no weapon.
Only the Sage 2 got a choil but the cutting edge lenght is eventually as long as the edge provided by the Techno.
The Sebenza with its hollow ground got no drag, the FFG blade of the SAGE2 is perfect and the techno thick blade is continuing to amaze me.

Soyderco Techno
Now the Techno is the shortest, the thickest, the sharpest and the less smooth to open. But the last kid in the block got more pocket time than the other knives and it’s small enough to get on board with another knife without to be noticed. I often carry it with a Douk Douk Ecureuil in the back pocket or a Spyderco Manbug in the watch pocket. The techno got also a lanyard hole, which is a lacking option on the Sage 2 and its ergos are clever enough for not needing any choil for secure grip.
The Sebbie has open the way. Spyderco knows how to give great credits to the Reeve Integral Lock and have better ergos.
Three knives I do trust in any situation from deploying, cutting to resharpening.

Spyderco Techno C158TI – Is it my fav’ EDC ever ?


Of all the knives I have ever owned this one is blending everything I love in a knife. IMHO this the perfect EDC.
This one was able to kick my beloved Native 5 out of my pocket. Why? Better clip for example. Better edge/handle ratio, too. (The Native 5 is a gem and much more southpawn friendly…)
Better than my beloved Michael Walker ? Again a better clip and stronger construction. (The C22 ZDP189 hollow ground blade is pure cutting performances and unbeatable yet…)
And as I have stated in various reviews, since the 90’s, I always wanted a Sebenza with FFG and a Spyderhole… Marlin Slysz should have heard my wish.

Spyderco Techno

The Techno is one of Spyderco favorite concepts : a “Little Big Knife”.
Really. A thick blade like a Lionspy. Strong Chris Reeve Integral lock. Titanium construction with strong blade steel… Thick is good in my book if it’s not killing the perfs. Nordic knives like Pekka Tuominen extraordinary Nilakka tend to be thick and sharp. This is not common as many “tactical” folders emphase the thickness and forget the sharpness. But Spyderco has always been really performance obsessed. So the Techno is thick. Thicker than the Tuff. The back of the blade is an invitation for your thumb to push. This is really pleasant to whittle with the Techno as the thumb is not soared.
Handling the Prototype, I thought then, the blade was not enough pointy to my taste. I was wrong. My Techno got enough penetration power to gently pierce plastics. Not as Pointy as my C36 Millie. But much more solid.

The Techno is performance oriented: the full flat ground (FFG) blade got a thin edge which is incredibly aggressive. As far as I know, Carpenter’s CTS-XHP is becoming one of my favorite cutlery steel. I was not able to really dull the Techno’s edge since I got it. I’ve got some minor factory edge rolling after using it on a plate and it has been cured in 10 secondes on white ceramic. Since I receive it the Techno have never let me down. It was razor sharp and stays razor sharp. What more do you ask from your EDC?

Ergonomy. Yes. No choil on this one but some kind of hidden choil which means plenty of room for a strong 4 fingers grip and a great Blade/handle ration. Everything is designed for high reliability and usefulness. Closed in your fist, the Techno disappears and is warm to the touch. Its weight is pleasant as it is oozing high quality from its titanium pores. No hot spot on the handle. Nothing to file or to sand. The Techno is blister free and much more ergonomic than my beloved Sebbies for example.
Pleasant to the eye also: the bead blasted handle and blade is giving your tool some hardchore background. This knife is for serious cutting business. Bushcrafters of the world, again, this is a folding tool to consider. There is even a lanyard hole to secure your Techno !

Anyway, the Techno is easy to carry: equipped with the deep wire clip, the knife once clipped look like a… some kind of lighter. The blue G10 spacer helps a lot in giving some friendly image to the Techno.

Sh*t, the Techno got A+++ on all the requirements to become my favorite EDC ever… Now time and mileage will tell… So far its concept corresponds to something I’ve really been looking for: some strong “toolish” character + some real cutting performances in a small “easy to EDC” package.
Thank you Marlin for bringing such a gem to the cutlery world. And “gem” in French is “J’aime”: I love it !!! 🙂

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