Native 110V Sprint run used as skinner.

It’s in Italian as it was filmed in Tuscany after the hunting linked here.
But I think you will enjoy to see how the Native 5 S110V blade goes well on skinner hares job.
The walker is here.  And Valter review of it is here.
FYI hare hunting is a traditional hunt for the poormen to put meat on the table.

Capture d'écran 2017-11-11 19.29.51

Advertisements

Spyderco C211TIP Marcin Slysz SpydieChef — Folding Utilitarian Cooking Knife.

20171109_110835-011207972581.jpeg

OK , I do love acronyms, pardon my French but when I have received the Spydiechef I was very excited to test a design made for chefs: a folding tool cooks could keep in their pocket.
Knowing my needs to turn SD design into tools, this time the grass was cut under my feed. Marcin Slysz purpose was very clear even in the material choice.
But first the design.

20171109_111444-01811877249.jpeg

Why using a Sebenza like handle ? Because Titanium is stainless and the opening construction is easy to clean. It’s also a relatively thin design, easy to pocket. No jimping, no need for and again easier to rince under water.
Because a cooking tool do get dirty. Here for example are the remain of Mozzarella di Buffala…
20171109_113238-01131262360.jpeg

The choice of the blade steel is also interesting. LC200N is a state-of-the-art high nitrogen alloyed tool steel that is specifically formulated to offer superior corrosion resistance and extreme toughness, even at high levels of hardness. I have used carbon steel with patina on it and no smell or taste has been noticed during their use with food, but here with that kind of steel you are certain to show a clean knife to inspection before starting your recipes…

20171109_111511-011364459906.jpeg

So the whole knife is very much completely impervious to rust. That means it could also been used near the sea and even on a boat where the possibility to open and close a rust free knife with one hand can be really safe and useful. There is no steel insert to prevent excessive wear on the lock, like many new RIL locks nowadays. I don’t know if the titanium has been heated to be harder, or perhaps the nitrogen alloy is not abrasive ?
One thing which can be noticed is that this alloy can be ground flat when H1 could not. All H1 steel were hollow ground blade.

 

Back to the kitchen. Once closed it needs a bottle to stand up right. Chose your poison !
20171109_111421-011713540165.jpeg

The detent is quite strong and is the main brake to the opening and closing of the blade. The more it will be in use the better it will become. unlock, the blade falls free and there is no blade lateral or vertical. Taichung has done a great work again.

20171024_153821-011950064838.jpeg
But what is especially great with that Marcin’s design is the possibility to cut on board.
It’s much easier than to use a flipper knife for example as here all the edge can get in contact with the cutting board with nothing on the way even no choil. Practical to do all those moves for vegetable preparations for example. This is very very practical in my book.

20171109_111552-01619952168.jpeg
20171109_112351-01808066952.jpeg

The factory edge was so sharp and toothy, it was a breeze to cut into tomatoes. Tomatoes are a good test for sharpness as those fruits can have a resilient skin on very soft flesh.
The Spydiechef was a razor right out of the box and the geometry is thin enough for its main battlefield: the kitchen.

20171109_111720-011679500858.jpeg

The broad blade goes easily with a lot of control. And the lenght makes it handy in polyvalence. You would need a longer blade too, but the Spydiechef can do 90% of the work with precision and ease. It is also a beautiful tool to use and feel under the hand.

20171109_112158-011261822741.jpeg

20171109_120927-01445039217.jpeg

And out of the kitchen ? Is the Spydiechef a knife to go ?
Yes it is.  With it’s belly, this knife can be a nice tool to bring with you during hunting season. You can hold it by the broad blade and you got a very efficient skinner.  I still don’t know how the edge will last on dirty rabbit hairs but so far it was easy to keep the edge razor sharp with a light touch up.
On wood, the knife goes steady and deep as the edge is thin and the belly helps a lot. The lock is also very sturdy. I was able to get big chips of wood. The blade is not fragile either especially the tip which won’t break easily. So yes, the cook can go camping ! There is even a lanyard hole, so the knife was thought with outdoor safety in mind.
Overall this is a lovely knife, which can be a great EDC. At least it’s not a free ticket to jail.
It works great in the kitchen and I’m looking forward using it on bigger chores.

20171109_113622-01287808915.jpeg

20171109_111342-01369045934.jpeg

20171109_110932-011009821988.jpeg

And the Chef and Honor.

20171111_215453-01840920890.jpeg

Getting my S30V Nilakka back to Zero Grind.

20171109_151902-01861321636.jpeg

As you can notice, my Nilakka was developping a gentle convexing ground since JD had the patience to give a decent edge to it two years ago.
But since, JD has sent me another video showing how tough well heat treated S30V can be and knowing how forgiving my Nilakka and my Wolfspyder were after sharpening beyond factory edge… I have decided to put the blade flat on on diamonds and grind it until the convex bevel disappearance. In fact I was very encouraged with my various experience with that Wolfspyder.  S30V heat treated by Spyderco is now back as a friendly steel in my book.

20171109_142525-01673358995.jpeg

So for one hour I have work on that using a new Double Stuff 2 which I have discovered thanks to Howard Korn from the Knifecenter who gently add it in my last parcel.
The new diamond surface is quite abbrasive and soon the blade was a mess.
But continuing in the same way made the scratches all going in one direction and both side of the Nilakka blade soon were acceptable in term of esthetics.

20171109_153932-011005452034.jpeg There is a lot of matter to remove and by hand, it takes some time.
But eventually I was able to get some sharpness back with not pressure on the edge while sharpening but an even pressure on all the side of the blade.

After all the Nilakka was made that way, the angle of the thicked stock blade was designed by Pekka Tuominen to be a zero ground edge, with no bevel.

There is still a micro bevel but I’m almost there.
My idea for future refreshing of the Nilakka edge it to do like with my Wolfspyder: like scandi sharpening shown in Ray Mears video…. only using the flat of the blade as guide.

For now I got a razor able to make hairs jumping and been harvested with only one caress.

But also it can stand whittling in hard wood: no chipping or edge warping.
More to come very soon, as I will erase definitvely that microbevel, but I need more time…
“I need more time to make good on the promises I made to the world
When the world was moving slower…” Justin Sullivan.

20171109_154643-01285377020.jpeg

Spyderco Manix Blue Sprint C101GBL2 — Seven Years of EDC, New Homemade Caged Ball.

20171028_154649-011832632136.jpeg

My wife’s cousin used his Manix 2 since I have given it to him seven years.
The knife is his EDC both at his work and at home.
Every year I sharp it for him and I have noticed that the knife looks like new after all those services.
But last week the caged protecting the ball lock has broken (The hardened steel ball bearing encased in a polymer cage).
Thanks to his work, where he works as modeling mold, he was able to measure the broken part and make a new one in resin. He choosed blue resin for obvious reason.
He’s planning now to make it in aluminium.

20171028_154700-011955745222.jpeg

20171028_154705-01354208722.jpeg

Yojimbo2 vs Paramilitary2 — Face 2 Face !

20171031_131913-01430006665.jpeg

I got two requests for writing that little comparaison hence a lot of users are hesittating between those two radical designs.

My Yojimbo2 is a special edition as is my Paramillie 2. Both got carbon fiber handles. Both are made in Golden, Colorado, USA, Earth. Both are second generation.

The Yo2 has been designed by Michael Janich and The P2 by Eric and Sal Glesser. Both got compression locks and inhouse system invented by the Glesser. The Yo2 got an S90V blade and the Para got a 52100 ball bearing blade.

The steel in those exclusive runs are totally opposite. S90V is a powder metalurgy alien steel named CPM420V in the previous Century. It is like some kind chewing gum alloy which refuses to let got any particules even during sharpening when 52100 is more of traditionnal old timer bladesmith steel of choice with carbon and a pinch of chromium. S90V got carbid of vanadium and chromium and more than 2% of carbon. 52100 got 1.2% of carbon. They are on the two opposite sides of the famouse best steels spectrum. S90V will stay sharp more than 3 times longer than 52100 if used on abbrasive material like cardboard. But 52100 will be easy to reach razor sharpness. S90V loses its razor edge very fast before to keep a plateau of working edge for a very very long time.

20171031_131953-011996735069.jpeg

Both knives got a convexed edge, it was a bear to obtain it on S90V.
Both got very pointy tips fir a equivalent lenght.
But the Yo2 blade is saber hollow ground when the P2 is full flat ground.

20171031_132320-01419109098.jpeg

On wood I have already noticed how great the Yo2 was for making sticks.
It has a very confortable handle for hard use and the keen edge got full power from the choil to the tip. Also the thick back helps a lot for pushing with the thumb.
Try the Yo2 on sticks: it will amazed you. But if you need some belly, the P2 will be obviously better. You won’t take the Yo2 for an hunting knife at all.

The Paramillie got this wonderful performance and control the full flat ground can provide. It is in his element: reliable and steady.
But the Self Defense knife is not the last in performing camp task. Do not underestimate it in that mattet as Michael Janich always advocated to use his knives to get used to their ergos and the way you carry them on your person.  the more you do it, the more you train to to draw them in stress situations.

20171031_132041-01501963538.jpeg

But in pure quick drawing, the Paramillie got a serious avantage: you can easily spyderdrop it. It is opened in a breeze just by drawing it by holding the hole. This is fast and actually faster than the Yo2 which required first to be clear from the pocket.
Both knives are equally smooth. The YO2 got a little more momentum because the blade is heavier. But, in my book, the Self Defense knife is beaten by the utility knife.
The Yojimbo got also more presence than the Paramillie2,  it is like one of wolverine claws and not really sheeple friendy.

20171031_132344-01629968294.jpeg

So really it just a matter of look and taste if you need to choose between them.
Both a high performance folders, with great locks, great ergos and an attention to detail breed in a second generation design. Both will find a way to be very useful in everyday  chores. They are false brothers but you know…
Now, the world don’t move to the beat of just one drum,
What might be right for you, may not be right for some……

20171031_132119-01615948243.jpeg

52100 Paramilitary 2 by the ocean.

So here I’m in Southern Bretagne near Lorient, city of Eric Tabarly with my Paramillie Exclusive Run in 52100 Ball Bearing Steel.
For those who don’t know Sal is a fan, this is why Eric is named Eric. 🙂

The moisture and salt are present and cars got a serious tendacy to rust just by being parked outdoor.

The knife has been used on food and for all the chores around another anniversary preparations. The Patina is a real surface protector as no pit or coloration has been noticed during that 4 days week end.

It eventually has been used to pop the remaining balloons after the party.
No oil needed. The edge did not rust. It was used daily. Very happy with that knife.
This is a very robust folder, with a strong blade.
It was still shaving hairs after 4 days of mild but constant uses. I did not process a lot of cardboard for example, but a lot of meat ! Duck for the matter.

The 52100 makes a beautiful blade with its mirror convexed edge. It was noticed.

52100 Fight the rust ! Force Patina !!

20171026_101318-011949251843.jpeg

After doing that picture for the Spyderco Forums….
I have noticed those red dots near the pivot on my Paramillie 2 in 52100.

Some “voiding the warranty” time later I noticed that…

Edited the 2nd of November 2017. This is not the case anymore as stated in Spyderco new warranty:
“If a knife has been disassembled and reassembled correctly—so as to maintain its proper mechanical function—this warranty remains in full effect. “

The problem is not the rust or the patina. 52100 is not stainless.
The problem is the fact that the pivot area is hidden under the scales and that rust can easily develop there without to be noticed.

20171026_102745-011365010555.jpeg

So the idea is to develop a patina on the whole blade and pivot area, to create a smooth “crust” protecting the surface.

20171026_102754-011293282873.jpeg

Of course yesterday I have put some vinegar to create my patina and some drops have been near the pivot… It was fast in rusting in that area without patina.

Let’s clean that first. I will use white compound and some paper towels.

20171026_103200-011352795203.jpeg

As you can notice this is not really deep pitting. There is just some patina forming under.
So now it’s time for a great vinegar bath…. It was really three screws to remove and I had access to the blade. No big deal. Warranty voided easily.

20171026_105222-011355942298.jpeg

Soaking the blade completely is not the most aggressive way to develop a patina as it needs to form acid and oxygen. It’s better to take the blade out of the bath and envelop it with paper towels. But here I wanted a slow and steady patina. So I let it submerged for one hour.

20171026_103325-01809241532.jpeg

On the picture above, you can still see the polished edge….

And after one hour of socking : all his grey and my polished edge is also stained gray now. So everything is cover with patina.

20171026_113859-011156554878.jpeg

Time to put some nano oil in the pivot and around.

20171026_114039-011893626695.jpeg

Working it an hundred time to smooth it. And cut myself in the process.

20171026_114417-01678644516.jpeg

Add some Ballistol for good measure and protect the blade. Stropping the blade on leather… The blade is perfectly centered. No play, smooth like on glass. The tolerance are really high in the construction of that knife.

20171026_115235-01414219514.jpeg

Et voilà: fight rust ! Force patina !!

20171026_114928-011587806665.jpeg

“52100 Tool Steel
AISI 52100 is a high carbon tool steel containing low quantities of manganese and chromium to improve hardening. Because of the low chromium levels in 52100 steel, it has very low corrosion resistance compared to other higher chromium tool steels.

In applications where corrosion is less of an issue, 52100 tool steel is considered an ideal, affordable option, offering a very fine grain with superior edge retention. It is capable of cutting a wide range of materials because of its combination of toughness, wear-resistance, and hardness.”
According to Carolina Knife Company.

(Thanks Brian for the head up !)

Spyderco Paramilitary 2 C81CF52100P2 52100 Exclusive Run – New Old Timer Workhorse !

I love Grandpa’s knives in a modern form, like the AFCK in M2HSS twenty years ago. But I was not able to jump on bandwagon to catch a Military in 52100. Lucky me, soon a Paramillie II designed by Sal and Eric Glesser was able with the same Carbon Fiber handles and the same 52100 blade.
Ed Fowler in his many articles in Blade Magazine and his books introduced me in the “magic” of 52100. Also my first blades in 52100 are my two gifted Lil Blue II made by my friend Ray Kirk of Raker knivesRaker knives. Ed as a cowboy and Ray as a Native American ? Made in Golden ? This knife is the true heir of American traditional blades !

“52100 is the steel of which most of the bearings used in all walks of life today are made. Civilization rides on 52100 steel. If it were less than reliable, another steel would be used instead. I have used 52100 exclusively in my knives for the past five years. I have forged many bearings into blades. I have given my blades every opportunity to fail, subjecting them to rigorous, destructive tests. I have found 52100 to be the cleanest, most uniform steel that I have ever used. Properly forged and heat treated, 52100 produces a high-performance blade that knows no peers. I have reached this conclusion based upon extensive personal research, testing knives for the things that they need to do in the real world of knife function.

Bearing-quality 52100 steel blades are tough and normally pass the 90° flex test without cracking or breaking. Their strength is evidenced by the force required to flex them.

I demand three levels of performance from any knife intended for serious use. First, it must have the ability to cut and cut well. Second, the blade must be tough. By tough I mean it must flex without breaking like a piece of glass. Last, but not least, it must be relatively easy to sharpen. Through the years, I have tried many steels and heat-treating methods and have tested the results by cutting a lot of rope and breaking many blades. Some combinations have cut extremely well, but have
broken or chipped when subjected to hard use. Drawn to a point where they were tough, these blades were too soft to cut effectively. I had settled upon one steel that when properly forged and heat treated cut very well. I had invested a great amount of time and effort getting the most out of that steel, so I was reluctant to change.

The nature of 52100 has changed drastically since that first bearing was made more than 100 years ago. Bearings are performance oriented, and those that last and gain a reputation for high performance are in demand. Every bearing is, by nature of its job description, routinely tested to its limit of performance. Competition is based solidly upon quality steel, and the outfit that makes the best steel enjoys a ready market for its product. Quality control is a high priority in the manufacture of bearing steel.

In addition to everything else, 52100 is easy to work, grind, and heat treat. Even less than perfect heat treatment can result in a good knife, though it never should be said that bladesmiths should settle for simply “good enough.” As the knifemaker’s skills develop, the performance potential of the steel will offer ample room for growth.
The high chrome content of 52100 promotes a beautiful mirror polish and enhances the steel’s machinability. The 1 percent carbon is more than can go into solution in the steel. However, unlike 1095, which has about the same amount of carbon, the excess carbon in 52100 also has 1.5 percent chrome to react with to make chromium carbides that can enhance cutting performance.
The “Cadillac of steels,” 52100 has been and continues to be one of the cleanest blade materials suitable for cutlery. Its primary use demands great care in manufacture. It’s also extremely versatile. For example, I’m aware of one man who makes
“52100 has been and continues to
be one of the cleanest steels suitable for cutlery.”

Ed Fowler, the lover of 52100 ball-bearing steel, sheep horn, and dedication to the functional knife.

For Sal Glesser, the functionnal knife is carbon fiber handle and impervious to wear and tear. CF got that magic to age great even after some falls on concrete.

As you can notice mine came perfectly centered. The Colorado Plant is now bringing perfect quality controls and a love to details you can appreciate in all angles.
The action is smooth ans the blade can fall by gravity when the lock is released.
As on the Yojimbo2 the compression is lock provides an action which is one of the smoothest out of the box but othing new about that.

Ok time to smooth the peel ply CF for saving my trousers from being filed and also smooth the hump which catch my pocket’s lip. Sandpaper at 500 has been used.

For the hump, like on my previous Paramillie, a diamond file is mandatory. 15 minutes later it’s much better !

Then, knowing 52100’s fun is the fact it can get a patina very quick, green lemon juice was used to start a gentle patina.

For good measure I wanted to compare how a 1075 carbon steel Opinel and that 52100 knife will react to the lemon juice.

In the same time I could try the new Double Stuff 2, Howard korn from the Knifecenter of The Internet has just offered me.

I was able to remove the shoulder and convexe my grind in a pair of minutes. Then with the white ceramic it was own to a mirror polish.
This is true 52100 get polished very easily. And the edge is like a mirror after some pass on leather. So this is also going to be fun.

WIth the lemon juice drying on its size, a patina soon appears.

And I was able to get a nice contrats with the convexed edge.

The knife bites in the wood like an hungry edge will. This should be a dream for Bushcrafters to get that kind of steel on such a modern and reliable plateform.
It can be turned into beyond razor very easily just by stropping my new convexed edge.
Yes, so easy to get it dangerously sharp and whittling hairs !!

The good thing also is that 52100 is supposed to be tougher than S30V and the thin point of the Paramillie needs plenty of strenght. Now I wonder what is the HRC of that blade.

I also like the matte black clip provided. It’s made for a low profile EDC.

It seems like the 1075 is getting drak faster than the 52100 as the wipe marks are visible on the Opinel blade.

So the Paramillie 2 is now ready to get some used. I will go near the Ocean for four days at the end of the week. It will be occasio to test it in a humid and salty environment.

 

The new king of bottle butt cutting is my Opinel N°12. It goes through plastic like in butter. The Paramillie is stuck but slowly and steady goes through.
But so far nothing beats the Nilakka or the Opinel in that exercise.
But the 52100 will be slowly more thinned for that matter. 52100 is a steel to be thinned on the edge.

20171024_161430-01551097416.jpeg

20171024_163653-0185090506.jpeg

Cutting bread is another great test. The cruch is hard and the inside is soft. That’s why Opinel are great on that too. But here the Paramillie is also reliable.
52100 is “alive” . It means it needs care and the patina will evolve in time.
I have greased the pivot and now the cheese is greasing the blade. Let’s not forget Carbon Steel folders have been in use much more longer than stainless steel. Roman folders have been found in archeologic sites. So this Eric and Sal design enhanced by this bold move — bringing 52100 to a modern folder — is all an adventure !!
So…
“New” because it’s a new idea to give ball bearing steel to a tactical folder when the tendance is to S35V and M390 manufactured in China (Don’t mistake me I do love my Falcon). “Old Timer” remembering the Schrade 1095 collection made in the USA and Workhorse because this is a knife made to be used not kept in a safe. It needs to be oiled and sharpened and used and oiled and honed…
More to come !!

20171024_162326-01128561663.jpeg

20171025_121742-01516747397.jpeg

20171025_122149-01711124613.jpeg

I remove the edge’s shoulder with the diamond side of a Double Stuff 2. I do that until I got a burr.

Doing it without guide, free hands, gives a gentle convex edge.
Then I use the white ceramic to erase the deep diamonds cuts.
And then leather stropping. On 52100 it is a breeze to do.
Now it can whittling hairs.

And for good vintage look, some P1000 sand paper on the clip will age it.
But rust could be a problem in the pivot area… as shown on part II.

20171025_154513-01410924470.jpeg

 

A Wolfspyder in Norway.

Taking the scandi ground Wolfspyder to Norway was logical choice but this little knife has revealed itself as a very reliable EDC in a lot of domains.

First it was easy to carry with his new deep carry clip and kept warm even in the Dovre National Park  .

There it was used for picnic duty where the sharp point was perfect to dig in plastic and cut some bread. Nothing extraordinary.

It was a light equipment in the bergen.

It was also the occasion to compare its grind with traditional Norwegian fixed blades.
You can notice how Ray Mears has studies this designs before starting his homework.

The belly of the Wolfspyder’s handle is the same as its ancestors.

In Norway a man without a knife is a man without a life.  Even if nowadays, in Oslo the fin to carry a knife without purpose can reach 1500 kron, 170 dollars !
This world is getting crazy as bad men will always find a way to carry an hidden butcher or parrying knife but responsable people can not enjoy the oldest tool ever made by human beings…

The traditional knife is still, like a silver pocket watch, considered as a jewel in the countryside.

The Wolfspyder was a delight to use. The thick stock blade and the zero ground scandi on mine was wonderful for whittling. The edge bites and digs really deep and I was able to drill in tree roots with no fear to break anything. You can use that folder very hard and this is really one of the “Little Big Knives” Spyderco knows how to produce. This is a compact workhorse ! And S30V has not let me down. It was not sharpen for a week and back home it is still razor sharp.

20171022_154414-01330456169.jpeg

I also let other people borrowing my knife for other mondane tasks like preparing roses bouquets for a big Viking dinner where 100 people were invited.

20171020_183038-01404392264.jpeg

The knife was not especially cleaned and S30V stay sharp and stainless. The open handle design makes it easy to check for dirts and rinse it under the tap.

20171020_213517-0147704224.jpeg

As my personal and only knife, it has been used in my plate. I was not able to make it dull even on Norvegian bread.

20171021_101526-01257068139.jpeg

Used and compared with the Polestar I have gifted to a viking friend of mine who is also a carpenter, both knives were used through the week. The Polestar was quicker to draw with the Spyderdrop and both knives were easy to keep sharp and clean.

The Wolfspyder is really one of my favorite little big knives. Its performance and reliability are stellar. It’s a real pleasure to cut into hard material with that kind of edge and the grind elimine any fear of broking the tip of the blade.
I was really surprise at the ease and speed I was able to make sticks and process wood with sucha smallish folder. The big fat handle is helping a lot but the S30V scandi still amazes me in the way it goes deep in the woodfibers ans stays sharp… It’s a pocket chainsaw !

20171022_142240-01510145831.jpeg

 

The Falcon has Landed by JD

This is not going to be a review but just my first impressions of the Massdrop, Ferrum Forge, WE-Knives Falcon.

I have been following Elliot en Chis Williamson, Ferrum Forge, their knife making journey on YouTube for a few year now. From Elliot’s start in his garage and the making of his first folders to the established brand that they are now. The knives they make are interesting for sure but outside of my budget. So, when I read about their collaboration with Massdrop and WE-Knives to make an small, flipper, folding knife that would less than $150, I ordered one as soon as the Drop was opened. A little later Nemo decided to do the same.

Nemo received his example a few days before I got mine. He wrote very positively about his example. So I was very interested to see how I would like mine!

For the most part I concur with Nemo’s review. This knife is a lot of value for money and seems very well put together! It fires snappier that the Spyderco Mantra 2 I recently reviewed, due to having a stronger detent. What it shares with the Mantra 2 is that you have to be careful not to put any pressure on the lock bar. If you do it won’t fire. The jimping on the flipper tab is pretty sharp and after flipping the Falcon a few times it became uncomfortable. This can probably by fixed by rounding the edges with a hone or some sandpaper. I could not use the hole in the blade to open the blade one handed but it worked well for opening it with both hands.

The blade came decently sharp though can be improved upon. The handle is nicely rounded and fits well in the hand.

There is just one problem with the Falcon which stops me from carrying it, and that is the pocket clip. It is much too tight for my jean pockets! I have to use two hands and push hard to get it clipped. I have no such issues with Spyderco clips. Interestingly enough I had the same problem with the WE-knives 617 that I got to handle on a pass around a couple of months ago. Apparently WE-Knives clips are just not for me. Perhaps in the future WE-Knives or Massdrop will start offering bent clips for the Falcon (and other WE-Knives). Then I would be able to clip it to my pocket make it part of my EDC. The knife deserves it!

%d bloggers like this: